Waylon/Singer of Sad Songs

Waylon-Jennings-.jpg

The covers on these 1970 recordings feature a finely dressed Waylon more closely resembling a Rat Pack member than his iconic image as a longhaired scruffy outlaw. Underneath lay the first musical rumblings of Waylon’s eventual rejection of the Nashville record-making system, with songs like the tempting “I May Never Pass This Way Again” and “The Thirty Third of August.” His earthy, craggy voice put a distinctive stamp on songs penned by George Jones, Bill Anderson, Chuck Berry and even The Rolling Stones. Singer of Sad Songs brought focus to Waylon’s vision and was an artistic success (albeit not a commercial one), combining R&B (“Sick and Tired”), folk (“If I Were a Carpenter”) and country. An essential collection for any Waylon fan.

Comments

Recent Music Posts More

More News

“We’re putting the fans first to give them that new, fresh feeling,” Dierks said.
The Opry goes pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
Sturgill Sings “Turtles All the Way Down.”
John Carter Cash allegedly strips in Newfoundland airport.
New collection features appearances by Sara’s daughters, Olivia and Audrey.