Son of a Preacher Man

John-rich-album.jpg

Having risen to the top as part of the party-starting duo Big & Rich and expanded his interests into writing hits for others and TV projects like Nashville Star and Gone Country, John Rich now attempts to establish his identity as a solo artist at last. His pre-Big & Rich solo album, Underneath the Same Moon (unreleased until 2006), was a play-it-safe proposition along the lines of his previous band, Lonestar, but Son of a Preacher Man takes a few more chances—with mixed results.

John is one of Nashville’s top songwriters for a reason, and his singing voice is likeable, even if not as distinctive as the opposites-attract harmonies of Big & Rich. Preacher Man only really trips up when the disparate elements of John’s persona collide. It’s difficult to reconcile populist working-man anthems like the topical hit “Shuttin’ Detroit Down” and dead-serious ballads like “Why Does Somebody Always Have to Die” with the Big & Rich-style blinged-out urbanity of flashier tracks like “Everybody Wants to Be Me.”

Comments

Recent Music Posts More

More News

Country star opens up on “Entertainment Tonight.”
Honored for his leadership, volunteerism and advocacy.
“The Voice” champion has reality singing competition worlds colliding on her current tour.
All-star concert heads to the Ryman Auditorium, Dec. 1.
Jimmy’s book about being a recipient of the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree Program is now a television movie airing on UP.