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Living In Black And White (Row Music Group)

Eddie Raven album review

After racking up 39 hits between 1974 and '91, Eddy Raven pretty much gave up on recording. Living In Black And White, his first full-fledged studio album in a decade, may just prove to be worth the wait.

Always a talented writer, Eddy contributed to four of Black And White's dozen songs and interprets some stellar material written by others. He's already notched up a minor hit with "Cowboys Don't Cry," and could have another with the gently rocking "Don't Worry About Me," or the tear-stained ballad "A Little Bit More." He also lights up the deep country of the brooding "Coldest Fire" and the daddy's-little-boy-no-longer anthem " 'Til I Can't Hold You Anymore."

Fans of Jimmy Buffett's airy, Caribbean-flavored work will enjoy the title cut, as well as the lyrically clever story of a tense trio of friends encountering relationship ripples in "Bermuda Triangle." Throughout, producer Ron Chancey provides a clear, crisp background for Eddy's smooth voice.

Eddy has always drawn on his rich, deep Louisiana musical roots for inspiration, and that heritage shows up again in the closing "New Orleans Is A Mighty Good Town"-- it's not exactly country, but it is the catchiest song to come out of Nashville in a long time.

Living In Black And White is not just a treat for listeners and die-hard Eddy Raven fans. It also represents a welcome return to active duty for one of country's lost heroes.

-- Mark Marymont

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