Tyler Farr Defines “Redneck,” Gets a Little “Redneck Crazy” for Album Release

Celebrates with explosions.

photo courtesy Sony Music Nashville

Tyler Farr seems to know a bit about being a redneck, but despite the lyrics of his new hit single, “Redneck Crazy,” it has very little to do with throwing empty beer cans at an ex’s house.

“‘Redneck’ originated from blue-collar guys that worked hard,” he explains to Country Weekly. “It goes to guys who work hard to support their families, whether that meant working three jobs, doing whatever they had to do to support their family back in the old days. You built stuff with your hands and you were out there with a hammer and a nail, and that’s where the term redneck came from. It’s about people working hard and earning an honest living to make it in this world. It isn’t going out shotgunning beers and throwing them at windows.”

He adds that these days, a person doesn’t have to actually do manual labor to be considered a redneck. “You can work behind a desk and be in New York City and being working at a big corporation in a skyscraper and be a redneck,” he explains. “You may not know it, but you are because you’re working hard to make something of yourself and leave something behind when you’re dead and gone. ‘Redneck’ is just all about working hard and supporting the things you care about the most—your friends, your family, and God and your country.”

Of course, it doesn’t hurt to have explosives—at least when you’re celebrating the release of your debut album. Tyler did, in fact, get a little “redneck crazy” in a series of videos on his website to demonstrate what he thinks that particular term means.

Redneck Crazy is available in stores and on iTunes. And Tyler is featured in this week’s issue of Country Weekly, on stands now.

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