Gary Allan Clarifies Comments on Country: “Our Genre Has Enough Room”

Notes how his own music has changed along with the genre.

The debate has been raging this week, but Gary Allan says the statements he made on Larry King Now about country music and his fellow artists were taken out of context.

In the clip, Larry asks Gary if he thinks Carrie Underwood and Taylor Swift are country. “I would say no,” was Gary’s reply. “I would say they’re pop artists making a living in the country genre.” He also explains why things may be that way, based on radio listener demographics.

Perhaps understandably, the comments and the way they’ve been presented sparked quite a reaction and Gary is hoping to clarify them.

“For the record, I always have and always will love country music,” said Gary in a Facebook post. “While our genre has evolved, I stand behind what I said in the interview: ‘To me country is still about Monday through Friday, and pop is about what happens on the weekends. But it’s definitely changed.’”

Gary also points out that his own music has changed since he arrived on the scene more than a decade ago, and that he loves the more traditional sounds of Buck Owens and George Jones.

In the interview, Larry described current country as an “amalgam,” an assessment with which Gary agreed. “Country music is a blend these days,” he added on Facebook. “Our genre has enough room in it for me, a country artist whose country leans towards rock and for more pop sounding country artists, as well as more traditional sounding country artists. None of us are the same, but we all make country radio our home.”

Check out the full interview below.

Full Interview with Larry King

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