On the Edge: Logan Brill

photo by Cassandra Leete/T Cannon Media

“I’ve always been very infatuated with really depressing thoughts and things, even though I’m not a very depressed person, I guess,” says singer/songwriter Logan Brill with a laugh.

You could be excused for thinking otherwise after listening to Walking Wires, the 22-year-old Knoxville, Tenn., native’s latest album, which sounds at times like the aftermath of a particularly messy breakup. 

The trauma of relationships past permeates the slow-burning album opener “No Such Thing as Ghosts” as well as the fragile “Scars,” which Logan did write about one of her own relationships. If I survive this broken heart, she sings, soon you’ll be another scar.

She insists she’s not as heartbroken as the record suggests.

“I gravitated towards those themes of those songs because the human emotion of loss and sadness, I’ve always thought that was a really genuine emotion that isn’t always necessarily touched on,” she explains.

Logan’s jazz-tinged vocals are perfectly restrained on those heavy ballads.

The intensity gets turned up on the stormy “Month of Bad Habits” and “Ne’er Do Wells,” which has a touch of The White Stripes’ gnarly garage rock in its DNA.

Both tunes show off Logan’s ability to wail like a long-lost blues singer, which she honed as a pre-teen singing in her brother’s band.

Instead of obsessing over Britney Spears, like her friends, the 11-year-old Logan was soaking up as much Buddy Guy and Stevie Ray Vaughan as she could.

“I always really loved that style of music,” she recalls. “I ended up straying away from that but I still wanted to keep at least a little bit of that in this album, just ’cause it’s kind of where I came from.”

Logan also chronicles some of the bad decision making that ensues in the wake of sadness and loss.

In “Rewind,” she’s out all night numbing the pain, just wishing she could go back to a better time before things turned so rotten, and in “Month of Bad Habits,” she’s totally off the rails in her effort to wash a guy out of her hair.

It may not necessarily be about her own life, but Logan says there’s a kernel of truth.

“Everybody’s been down that road at least once,” she says. 

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